Olmsted Visionaries FAQ


Is there any fee or minimum size gift required to join the Olmsted Visionaries?

There are no dues, fees or minimums associated with membership in The Olmsted Visionaries.

Do I have to disclose the dollar amount I have designated in my estate plans for the benefit of Central Park and the Conservancy?

No specific financial disclosures are required to become an Olmsted Visionary. However, we do appreciate such information for our records if you feel comfortable providing it. All information you provide will be held in strictest confidence.

Do I need to provide a copy of my will or other estate planning document as proof of my commitment to the Park?

No, you are not be required to provide a copy of your will or any other document to the Conservancy to become an Olmsted Visionary. However, we do appreciate such documentation for our records if you feel comfortable providing it. All such documentation will be held in strictest confidence.

Do you require any type of signed agreement confirming the Central Park Conservancy is part of my estate plan?

A confirmation in any form you prefer — either in written or verbal — indicating that you have included the Conservancy in your estate plans is all that is required for membership in the Olmsted Visionaries.

What happens if I change the amount I have designated for Central Park in my estate plans after I become an Olmsted Visionary?

We understand that personal and financial circumstances change and that your estate plans may need to be updated in the future. As long as your estate plan still includes Central Park as a beneficiary in any way, you are an Olmsted Visionary.

Who can I contact for more information about becoming an Olmsted Visionary?

The Office of Planned Giving at the Central Park Conservancy can answer all your questions. Please contact Larry Decker, Director of Institutional and Planned Giving at 212-310-6645 or email at Ldecker@centralparknyc.org for more information about the Olmsted Visionaries or any other questions you may have about remembering Central Park in your estate plans