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Delacorte Clock

Feature/Facility

Delacorte Clock

On a brick archway between the Central Park Zoo and Tisch Children's Zoo stands the whimsical George Delacorte Musical Clock. Between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm, on the hour and half-hour, this band of animals comes to life to play a repertoire of children's songs and seasonal tunes.

Delacorte Theater

Feature/Facility

Delacorte Theater

The Delacorte Theater is an open-air venue off the shores of Turtle Pond. While closed in the winter, it serves as the summer home to the Public Theater's free annual productions of Shakespeare in the Park.

Denesmouth Arch

Feature/Facility

Denesmouth Arch

Denesmouth Arch, with its pale sandstone blocks, was one of Calvert Vaux's earliest arches. It supports the 65th Street Transverse Road above, and below connects the landscape of the Dene with the Central Park Zoo. The four elegant posts of Denesmouth Arch were originally topped with four ornate bronze lampposts.

 Dipway Arch

Feature/Facility

Dipway Arch

Dipway Arch carries Center Drive above. The arch's most obvious distinguishing feature is the granite curves along the abutments. More subtly, features are hidden inside: benches built along the walls underneath the arch and an elaborate brick-and-granite design appearing in the arch's ceiling.

Doris Freedman Plaza

Feature/Facility

Doris C. Freedman Plaza

Located at the southeast entrance to the Park, Doris C. Freedman Plaza is named for Doris C. Freedman, who founded the Public Art Fund and served as New York City's first director of cultural affairs. Since 1977, it has hosted more than 60 sculptural art installations.

Driprock Arch

Feature/Facility

Driprock Arch

Driprock Arch features a red, brick facade, along with Gothic details in sandstone. The pedestrian walk underneath connects Heckscher Playground to Wollman Rink. Originally, the arch traversed a bridle path that was destroyed in the 1930s after the playground expanded.

Duke Ellington

Feature/Facility

​Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington, the larger-than-life bronze sculpture of the jazz legend with his grand piano, stands in Duke Ellington Circle, at the Park's northeast corner. This sculpture, dedicated in 1997, was the first erected in Ellington's honor in the country.

 Eagles And Prey

Feature/Facility

Eagles and Prey

Eagles and Prey is the oldest known sculpture in any New York City park. Located on the western edge of the Mall, the bronze statue is particularly notable for its level of exquisite detail.

Eagles

Feature/Facility

Eagles, Group of Eight

These eight fierce eagles guard the grounds of the Central Park Zoo. Carved by the New York firm Rochette and Parzini, the granite eagles originally perched on the piers of Bay Ridge. When the First Avenue overpass was demolished in 1941, the eagles left the streets of Brooklyn and were installed in this lively animal sanctuary.

Fitz Green Halleck

Feature/Facility

Fitz-Greene Halleck

Fitz-Greene Halleck memorializes the 19th-century poet and essayist most known for his satirical and romantic verse. His was the first statue of an American in Central Park.