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Blockhouse

Architectural Features

Blockhouse

West Side at 109th Street

The oldest building in Central Park, the Blockhouse was constructed far before the Park even existed. The stone structure was one of several built to defend New York from possible British attacks during the War of 1812.

Bow Bridge

Bridges & Arches

Bow Bridge

Mid-Park at 74th Street

With magnificent views across the Lake and into the Ramble, Bow Bridge is famously one of the Park's most romantic spots. It also has a storied history; it was the first cast-iron bridge in the Park and the second-oldest anywhere in America.

Bow Bridge Boat Landing

Architectural Features

Bow Bridge Boat Landing

Mid-Park at 73rd Street

Bow Bridge Boat Landing is one of five small, intricately beautiful structures sitting at the very shoreline of the Lake. Nestled within the Ramble, it offers a spectacular view of Bow Bridge.

Bridge 24

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 24

East Side at 86th Street

Bridge No. 24, one of the oldest cast-iron bridges in America, features a particularly elaborate Victorian design. It was originally built to allow pedestrians to stroll to the south gate house of the Reservoir without having to cross paths with horses on the bridle path.

Bridge 27

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 27

Mid-Park at 86th Street

Bridge No. 27 is one of three decorative and intricate cast-iron bridges that carry pedestrians above the bridle path to the gleaming waters of the Reservoir. A stunning example of Victorian decorative arts, Bridge No. 27 was designed by Calvert Vaux in 1864.

Bridge No. 28

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 28

Mid-Park at 94th Street

Bridge No. 28 is one of Central Park's three Reservoir bridges. It has earned the nickname “Gothic Bridge” due to its stunning Neo-Gothic design, which extends over the bridle path between the northern Reservoir and the Tennis Courts. It was designed in 1864 by Park designer Calvert Vaux.

Burnett Fountain

Statues, Monuments & Ornamental Features

Burnett Fountain

East Side at 104th Street

Burnett Fountain is a gorgeous memorial to classic children's book author Frances Hodgson Burnett. Set among the flowers of Conservatory Garden, the fountain features a bronze sculpture of a boy playing the flute and a young girl holding a bowl that functions as a bird bath.

Carousel

Recreation & Cultural Facilities

Carousel

Mid-Park at 65th Street

The Carousel has been a beloved Central Park tradition for nearly 150 years. Fifty-seven hand-carved and painted horses—plus two chariots—“gallop” along to Calliope music played by a mechanical organ. It's one of the largest carousels in the country, and with nearly 250,000 riders a year, also among the most popular.

Cedar Hill

Landscapes & Points of Interest

Cedar Hill

East Side at 76th-79th Streets

Cedar Hill is a classic pastoral landscape offering sledding in the winter and picnicking in warmer months. It takes its name from the stand of evergreens dotting the crest of the hill. At the southern border, the stone Glade Arch connects Cedar Hill to the south end of the Park.

Central Park Police Precinct

New York City Police Department

Central Park Police Precinct

Mid-Park at 86th Street

The 22nd Precinct covers all of Central Park's 843 acres, including its 58 miles of pedestrian paths, six miles of vehicle drives, and five miles of bridle paths. It is the oldest precinct in the City; officers operate out of a former horse stable designed by Jacob Wrey Mould in 1871.

Zoo Panda

Recreation & Cultural Facilities

Central Park Zoo

East Side at 63rd-66th Streets

Open year-round, the Central Park Zoo is home to animals from tropical, temperate, and polar parts of the world. This state-of-the-art facility features a sea lion pool in the center courtyard; glass walls offer a glimpse of their underwater acrobatics.

Chambers Boat Landing

Architectural Features

Chambers Boat Landing

Mid-Park at 76th Street

Chambers Boat Landing sits at the northern shoreline of the Lake. Although it was part of the Park's original design, the boat landing was removed in the 1950s, then rebuilt in 2016.