Park Features

While there are hundreds of different varieties of trees and plantings in Central Park (check out our Tree Guide and Bloom Guide to learn more), it offers much more than just natural beauty. Monuments, memorials, and recreational sites are among the many other features of this world-famous landscape.

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110th Street Bridge

Bridges & Arches

110th Street Bridge

West Side at 110th Street

The 110th Street Bridge, made of finely cut gneiss, carries traffic from Central Park West to the West Drive. It was built in the 1890s during the third wave of bridge-building on the Upper West Side of Central Park.

Balcony Bridge

Bridges & Arches

Balcony Bridge

West Side at 77th Street

Balcony Bridge supports the West Drive across an inlet connecting the Lake with Naturalists' Walk. On the east side of the bridge, benches sit inside balconies offering a gorgeous view over the Lake to the City skyline beyond.

Bow Bridge

Bridges & Arches

Bow Bridge

Mid-Park at 74th Street

With magnificent views across the Lake and into the Ramble, Bow Bridge is famously one of the Park's most romantic spots. It also has a storied history; it was the first cast-iron bridge in the Park and the second-oldest anywhere in America.

Bridge 24

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 24

East Side at 86th Street

Bridge No. 24, one of the oldest cast-iron bridges in America, features a particularly elaborate Victorian design. It was originally built to allow pedestrians to stroll to the south gate house of the Reservoir without having to cross paths with horses on the bridle path.

Bridge 27

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 27

Mid-Park at 86th Street

Bridge No. 27 is one of three decorative and intricate cast-iron bridges that carry pedestrians above the bridle path to the gleaming waters of the Reservoir. A stunning example of Victorian decorative arts, Bridge No. 27 was designed by Calvert Vaux in 1864.

Bridge No. 28

Bridges & Arches

Bridge No. 28

Mid-Park at 94th Street

Bridge No. 28 is one of Central Park's three Reservoir bridges. It has earned the nickname “Gothic Bridge” due to its stunning Neo-Gothic design, which extends over the bridle path between the northern Reservoir and the Tennis Courts. It was designed in 1864 by Park designer Calvert Vaux.

Dalehead Arch

Bridges & Arches

Dalehead Arch

West Side at 64th Street

Dalehead Arch carries the West Drive over the bridle path that takes pedestrians to the Heckscher Ballfields. Made of sandstone and red brick, the arch was originally constructed between 1860 and 1862.

Denesmouth Arch

Bridges & Arches

Denesmouth Arch

East Side at 65th Street

Denesmouth Arch, with its pale sandstone blocks, was one of Calvert Vaux's earliest arches. It supports the 65th Street Transverse Road above, and below connects the landscape of the Dene with the Central Park Zoo. The four elegant posts of Denesmouth Arch were originally topped with four ornate bronze lampposts.

 Dipway Arch

Bridges & Arches

Dipway Arch

Mid-Park at 60th Street

Dipway Arch carries Center Drive above. The arch's most obvious distinguishing feature is the granite curves along the abutments. More subtly, features are hidden inside: benches built along the walls underneath the arch and an elaborate brick-and-granite design appearing in the arch's ceiling.

Driprock Arch

Bridges & Arches

Driprock Arch

Mid-Park at 63rd Street

Driprock Arch features a red, brick facade, along with Gothic details in sandstone. The pedestrian walk underneath connects Heckscher Playground to Wollman Rink. Originally, the arch traversed a bridle path that was destroyed in the 1930s after the playground expanded.

Gapstow Bridge

Bridges & Arches

Gapstow Bridge

East Side at 62nd Street

Elegantly suspended over the neck of the Pond, Gapstow Bridge is one of the first landmarks to discover after entering the southeast corner of the Park. Its robust beauty is rivaled only by its view: a lush foreground set against a dramatic skyline of Central Park South, which includes the Plaza Hotel and other notable skyscrapers.

Glade Arch

Bridges & Arches

Glade Arch

East Side at 77th Street

Glade Arch is one of Central Park's oldest features, and one of the first arches designed by Calvert Vaux. Constructed in 1862, it was originally built wide enough to take horse-drawn carriages to Fifth Avenue. Today it serves as a scenic path for pedestrians just to the east of Cedar Hill.